Prop 6 Myths and Facts

#RebuildSoCal

#NoOnProp6

Protect Funds

Protect Projects

Get the Facts! 19 Myths About Prop 6

1 The money will go to the high speed rail.

No funds raised from SB 1 will be used to fund high-speed rail. California’s state-maintained highways and bridges will receive roughly half of SB 1 revenue: $26 billion.

The other half will go to local roads, transit agencies and an expansion of the state’s growing network of pedestrian and cycle routes. There is no remaining balance that could be used for the high-speed rail project.

2 Politicians will steal the money and use it for other things.

No funds from SB 1 go into the General Fund. Revenues go directly into transportation accounts and are constitutionally protected.

Article XIX of the California Constitution already protects the gasoline excise tax and vehicle registration fees, and a portion of the sales tax on diesel, and dedicates them to transportation purposes. This accounts for about 60% of the revenues generated by SB 1. Prop 69, passed by 80% of voters this past June, extended these same constitutional protections to the remaining 40% of new revenues generated by SB 1. It’s also important to remember, all gas tax moneys that were loaned in prior decades to the General Fund will have been repaid under SB 1.

3 We have enough money. Politicians just need to use it better.

California has a combined need of over $130 billion over the next 10 years just to bring the state highway and local street and road systems into a good and safe condition.

If we were to use funds from the General Fund, we would need to pull $130 billion from important areas like education, healthcare, public safety, and other programs that Californians rely upon. SB 1 follows the user-pay model where everyone pays their fair share and all drivers pay a little more to fix the roads they drive on. It’s a responsible, accountable way to fix our roads.

4 The gas tax is high enough.

Prior to last year, the gas tax hadn’t been raised to match inflation since 1994.

That’s like paying 2018 bills with 1994 wages. Since the gas tax was never raised to match inflation, it lost half of its buying power. This all happened as cars filled up less and drove more thanks to better MPG efficiency in vehicles. Analysts have said that had the gas tax been indexed to inflation, it would be at 30 cents a gallon. The new gas tax with last year’s increase is 30 cents a gallon—the same as it would have been had the tax matched inflation and prices.

5 This is fiscally irresponsible. Californians are taxed enough.

The California Department of Finance calculated that the average cost to motorists is roughly $10/month.

Here’s the math: Registration: Nearly 50% of all registered vehicles in California are valued at less than $5,000. Forty percent are valued at less than $25,000. Thus, the average annual amount for vehicle registration is approximately $48. Fuel: California’s 26 million licensed drivers consume 15.5 billion gallons per year. That is 577 gallons per driver, multiplied by 12 cents per gallon is $69.24 each. The annual average cost per driver is: Vehicle Registration: $47.85 and Fuel: $69.24 Total: $117.09 per year OR $9.76 per month. In comparison, research by TRIP reveals Southern California motorists each spend between $1419 and $2995 annually due to rough roads, lost time and fuel wasted in traffic congestion.

6 I won’t see the benefits, but I will be paying the price.

The benefits of the gas tax positively impact every single Californian in the form of better, safer roads and bridges.

In addition, this funding is a job creator and a critical economic stabilizer. The $5 billion annual investment due directly to the tax will create or support 68,000 jobs over a year in California throughout all sectors of the economy. The gas tax is already funding over 6,500 transportation projects throughout the state and will be funding an extra $1.8B in state and $1.8B in local transportation funding annually. These state and local projects will help you get to work faster and with less damage to your car, will help your families get to school, work, and home, and will help sustain the construction industry for this generation of workers and the generation that follows.

7 The money all goes to the General Fund and none of the money goes to new roads.

That is unequivocally false. Not a single dollar of gas tax funds goes to the General Fund.

  • Gas tax dollars are dedicated to the Motor Vehicle Fuel Account and the Highway Users Tax Account which are constitutionally and statutorily dedicated to transportation improvements.
    • Sources:
    • California Constitution Article XIX, Section 2: “Revenues from taxes imposed by the State on motor vehicle fuels for use in motor vehicles upon public streets and highways…shall be deposited in the Highway Users Tax Account…which is hereby declared to be a trust fund…”
    • California Constitution Article XIX, Section 1: “The Legislature shall not borrow revenue from the Highway Users Tax Account…and shall not use these revenues for purposes…other than those specifically permitted by this article.”
    • Revenue & Taxation Code, Sections 7360(a)(1), 8651(a)(5) & 7392; Section 7360(b)(1); Sections 60050(b)(1) – (2) & 6201.8
  • Furthermore, 81% of voters overwhelmingly passed Prop 69 in June, constitutionally preventing Sacramento politicians from raiding the new transportation improvement fees (vehicle fees) and ensuring these funds are only used for transportation improvements.
    • Sources:
    • California Constitution Article XIXD, Section 1: “….revenues derived from vehicle fees imposed under the Vehicle License Fee Law pursuant to Chapter 6 (commencing with Section 11050) of Part 5 of Division 2 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, or its successor, over and above the costs of collection and any refunds authorized by law, shall be used solely for transportation purposes, as defined by Section 11050 of the Revenue and Taxation Code, as that section read upon enactment of the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017….”
  • According to the nonpartisan, independent Legislative Analyst’s review of Proposition 6, “The State Constitution requires that nearly all of these new revenues be spent on transportation purposes… about two-thirds of the revenues (are dedicated) to highway and road repairs, with the remainder going to other programs (such as for mass transit).”
  • The fact is Proposition 6 will eliminate funding for more than 6,500 local transportation improvement projects underway in every California community, including:
    • 3,727 projects fixing potholes and repaving crumbling, unsafe roads 1,571 projects dedicated to improving road and driver safety
    • Repairs or replacement of 554 bridges and overpasses
    • 337 projects relieving traffic congestion
    • 453 improvements to public transportation operations and services including buses and rail to increase reliability, and
    • 442 projects improving pedestrian safety

8 California can use existing revenues to fix our roads.

Proposition 6 eliminates more than $5 billion annually in existing funding currently being used on more than 6,500 road and bridge safety, congestion relief and transportation improvement projects all over the state.

  • One hundred percent of gas tax revenues ARE constitutionally dedicated to transportation improvements.
    • Sources:
    • California Constitution Article XIX, Sections 1 & 2:
    • Revenue & Taxation Code, Sections 7360(a)(1), 8651(a)(5) & 7392; Section 7360(b)(1); Sections 60050(b)(1) – (2) & 6201.8.
  • Despite this, California still has a combined need of over $130 billion over the next 10 years just to bring the state highway and local street and road systems into a good and safe condition.
  • That’s because California has not increased transportation funding in more than 23 years and current funding has not kept pace with demand or inflation.
  • If we were to use funds from the General Fund, we would need to pull $130 billion from important areas like education, healthcare, public safety, and other programs that Californians rely upon.
  • Proposition 6 eliminates more than $5 billion annually in existing funding currently being used on more than 6,500 road and bridge safety, congestion relief and transportation improvement projects all over the state.

9 Yes on Prop 6 will save families upwards of $700 a year.

Yes on Prop 6 is a bad deal that will cost drivers more in the long run.

  • The average California driver already spends $739 dollars per year on front end alignments, shocks and tire repairs because of driving on bad roads.
  • Stopping projects that fix our roads means more car repairs and more money out of drivers’ wallets.
  • According to the State Department of Finance, the transportation funding law will only cost California drivers around $10 per month. Here are the facts:
    • Vehicle registration: Nearly 50% of all registered vehicles in California are valued at less than $5,000. Forty percent are valued at less than $25,000. Thus, the average annual Thus, the average annual amount for vehicle registration is approximately $48.
    • Fuel: California’s 26 million licensed drivers consume 15.5 billion gallons per year. That is 577 gallons per driver, multiplied by 12 cents per gallon is $69.24 each. 3
    • Thus: The annual average cost per driver is: Vehicle Registration $47.85 + Fuel $69.24. Total = $117.09 per year OR $9.76 per month

10 Yes on Prop 6 will immediately lower what you pay at the pump.

Prop 6 does not contain one single provision requiring gas prices to be lowered by oil companies or retailers. There are NO guarantees gas prices will be reduced.

  • The only guarantee is that Proposition 6 will immediately eliminate $5 billion annually in existing transportation funds dedicated to transportation improvements. Proposition 6 is guaranteed to make our roads, bridges and transportation system less safe, more congested and more deteriorated.

11 Prop 69 has loopholes and funds can still be diverted by politicians.

Prop 69 does not allow any borrowing or diversions, even under fiscal emergencies.

  • Furthermore, Proposition 22, passed by the voters in 2010, eliminated the ability of the Legislature to borrow gas taxes, even in a fiscal emergency.
    • Sources:
    • California Constitution Article XIX

12 There’s a “better way”. DeMaio’s plan would divert sales taxes on cars.

DeMaio’s proposal is unworkable, unconstitutional and clearly not serious. It undermines local control -- and would just rob locals of important funding for public safety, emergency response, and critical local services.

  • DeMaio’s proposal is unworkable, unconstitutional and clearly not serious.
  • DeMaio’s “plan” would divert local government revenues from sales taxes on cars that currently fund police, fire, emergency services, parks, libraries and even local transportation improvements — and redirect these dollars to the state.
  • It undermines local control — and would just rob locals of important funding for public safety, emergency response, and critical local services.

13 We can fix the roads just by eliminating waste in the system and from Caltrans.

There are more than 6,500 projects in all communities in California, proof that these funds are going to transportation, being spent efficiently and are accountable to taxpayers.

Furthermore, Caltrans has been mandated to reform its operations and save $100 million annually to ensure projects are completed faster and more efficiently. There are new reforms including establishing an independent Inspector General who is appointed to oversee projects and programs to ensure all funds are spent as promised and to reduce bureaucracy, waste, and red tape.

The fact is this measure will cost us all more in the long run and make our bridges and roads less safe.

14 Polling shows that voters support repealing the gas tax.

We’re confident voters will reject Prop 6 once they learn that it will make our bridges, roads, and transportation system less safe and eliminate funding for more than 6,500 projects currently underway in every community.

Our broad coalition of public safety leaders, engineers, business, labor, environmentalists and community leaders will wage an active campaign between now and November to educate the voters.

15 Passing Prop 6 will help the economy by lowering what we all pay.

The California Chamber of Commerce and business organizations throughout the state oppose Prop 6 because it would eliminate 68,000 jobs and $183 billion dollars in economic investments as thousands of road construction projects are halted.

16 The revenues that Prop 6 would eliminate are being used to repay loans and debt, not to fix roads.

All outstanding transportation loans are being repaid by the General Fund.

Proposition 6 will eliminate funding for more than 6,500 local transportation improvement projects underway in every California community, including:

  • 3,727 projects fixing potholes and repaving crumbling, unsafe roads
  • 1,571 projects dedicated to improving road and driver safety
  • Repairs or replacement of 554 bridges and overpasses
  • 337 projects relieving traffic congestion
  • 453 improvements to public transportation operations and services including buses and rail to increase reliability, and
  • 442 projects improving pedestrian safety

If Prop 6 passes, construction will come to a grinding halt in every city and county in the state, wasting money and making road conditions even worse.

17 This measure will help elect Republican candidates.

It’s a shame that some politicians are willing to jeopardize driver safety by eliminating funding for more than 6,500 transportation projects currently underway throughout the state.

We are confident voters will reject this dangerous attack on bridge and road safety repairs.

18 State transportation funds will be diverted to fund high-speed rail.

No funds raised will be used to fund high-speed rail.

California’s state-maintained transportation infrastructure is receiving roughly half of revenues to improve our state highways. The other half is going to local roads, transit and pedestrian and bicycle safety. There are no funds being used to support the high-speed rail project.

19 A broad coalition supports Proposition 6.

Prop 6 is opposed by more than 300 organizations including: California Professional Firefighters, California Association of Highway Patrolmen and many others.

Prop 6 is opposed by more than 300 organizations including:

  • California Professional Firefighters
  • California Association of Highway Patrolmen
  • American Society of Civil Engineers
  • Emergency responders and paramedics
  • California Chamber of Commerce
  • California League of Conservation Voters
  • League of Women Voters of California
  • California State Association of Counties
  • League of California Cities
  • State Building & Construction Trades Council of California
  • California Alliance for Jobs
  • California NAACP
  • Congress of California Seniors
  • Latin Business Association

You are donating to : Greennature Foundation

How much would you like to donate?
$10 $20 $30
Would you like to make regular donations? I would like to make donation(s)
How many times would you like this to recur? (including this payment) *
Name *
Last Name *
Email *
Phone
Address
Additional Note
paypalstripe
Loading...
Translate »